DELPHI盒子
!实时搜索: 盒子论坛 | 注册用户 | 修改信息 | 退出
检举帖 | 全文检索 | 关闭广告 | 捐赠
技术论坛
 用户名
 密  码
自动登陆(30天有效)
忘了密码
≡技术区≡
DELPHI技术
移动应用开发
Web应用开发
数据库专区
报表专区
网络通讯
开源项目
论坛精华贴
≡发布区≡
发布代码
发布控件
文档资料
经典工具
≡事务区≡
网站意见
盒子之家
招聘应聘
信息交换
论坛信息
最新加入: runx1680
今日帖子: 27
在线用户: 15
导航: 论坛 -> 文档资料 斑竹:liumazi,ruralboy  
作者:
男 pp0123 (pp0123) ▲▲▲▲▲ -
普通会员
2018/8/9 3:56:07
标题:
刚发布的 Delphi Roadmap 更新 浏览:2105
加入我的收藏
楼主: August 2018 Roadmap Commentary from Product Management
POSTED BY SARINA D ON TUESDAY, 7 AUGUST 2018 IN BLOGS
2018 has been a very exciting year so far for Embarcadero. In our roadmap, you can find the key features that we’ve planned for calendar year 2018/2019. Before we get to the details of our updated roadmap, we wanted to recap what we’ve delivered so far:

Back in March, we introduced RAD Studio 10.2.3, also known as 10.2 Tokyo Release 3, of Delphi, C++Builder and RAD Studio. This was the third release of Tokyo, and included CMake Command Line Support for C++, Rename Refactoring, Mobile support in Delphi and C++Builder Pro, RAD Server enhancements, FireMonkey User Interface Templates and more. 

Just last month, for the first time ever, we launched a full featured Community Edition for Delphi and C++Builder. Not only is it great for new developers, but our existing community can look forward to the next generation of knowledgeable Delphi developers picking up the torch and furthering their legacy with new Delphi projects. This is also true for C++Builder, since Community Edition provides a great entry point for C++ developers around the world to experience all that C++Builder has to offer, especially in terms of our multi-platform capabilities.   

As you will see in our roadmap, we have a lot of exciting features planned for the next major version release, 10.3 (aka Carnival), with the themes for the release being Language and Platform Enhancements for Multi-Device and Windows Developers. The modernization of the IDE will also continues at full pace.

We wanted to take this opportunity to share with you more details on several key focus areas outlined in our updated roadmap. 

 



More Details from Sarina DuPont
Sarina focuses on FireMonkey, the component libraries’ UX and styles, the installation experience and demos and documentation  

FireMonkey Z-Order and Native Controls
One of my focus areas since I started at Embarcadero back in 2011 has been FireMonkey. I’m very passionate about what developers can do with the FireMonkey framework to deliver on their multi-device application requirements. If you’ve been following my blog, you’ve seen that building stunning UIs with FMX is a theme carried through many of my posts. It’s an area where FireMonkey really shines, and combined with our FireUI designer, a very unique offering in the developer tools space.

The FireMonkey UI Templates that we released over the past several months for Delphi and C++Builder developers not only make it easy to get started building your own multi-platform applications, but they also showcase the flexibility that FireMonkey provides, and how to easily tweak UI themes to create a totally custom look and feel.  

For several years, we’ve gotten customer requests for Z-order and native controls support on Android. We’ve heard your requests and are actively working on Android Z-Order support in 10.3. This will allow developers to use FireMonkey styled controls such as buttons, labels and checkboxes with natively rendered controls like the browser and map control on the same form without the native control covering the styled control. This also provides the foundation for supporting natively rendered UI controls, such as TEdit, on Android. In the coming weeks, we’ll be inviting customers current on Update Subscription to our 10.3 NDA beta, so those interested can get an early look at what’s been in the works. We also plan to expand our native Android controls support to more controls in future releases.

Z-order support for Android will work the same as it does for Windows and iOS today, allowing developers to mix both styled controls and controls rendered by the underlying OS on the same form without any overlap issues.

Another Android related feature we’re working on is upgrading our Android API level support in RAD Studio to support level 26 (Android 8.0). This change requires significant work, and is not possible in a 10.2 update. This support is coming in 10.3. Although the usual beta restrictions do not allow for building and deploying production apps, active update subscription customers who join our 10.3 beta will find a special EULA provision allowing them to deploy (production) Android apps to the Google Play Store.

New Platform Support
Platform support is key with a multi-platform framework like FireMonkey. We know that Android 64-bit support will be mandatory by the summer of 2019, and are working on plans to ensure our customers can meet this requirement next summer. 

One roadmap change you may notice compared to the September 2017 roadmap is that we removed macOS 64-bit platform support from the initial 10.3 release.

This doesn’t mean that we don’t think macOS 64-bit is important. We removed it from the 10.3 release to focus on providing more quality and stability for the other key features that are in flight. With that said, our intent is to provide support for macOS 64-bit, including support for targeting the iOS 11 (and iOS 12) simulators, in a follow-on 10.3.x release. We know that developers looking to target the macOS App Store or leverage 64-bit APIs require macOS 64-bit support.

We have a number of customers today who distribute their existing 32-bit applications through their own web store and are currently not impacted by this Apple requirement. 

In terms of looking ahead, a couple of months ago Apple announced that it was deprecating support of OpenGL in favor of Metal 2, Apple's new GPU library. While OpenGL will continue to be supported in the next versions of macOS and iOS, we are reviewing what will be required to support Metal later next year.

  



More Details from Marco Cantu
Marco focuses on the Delphi language and RTL, the VCL library and Windows integration, all things database and Web oriented, including RAD Server 

VCL and Windows
While over the last few years RAD Studio and Delphi have expanded their focus on multi-device and mobile development with a single source code and compiled applications, the product remains rooted on Windows and in recent years we have made sure to keep a significant focus on VCL, the best component framework for Windows client applications. We have been adding new components and controls in each release. 

Today VCL offers great support for Win32 API, but also integration to the newer WinRT API of Windows 10. We have new controls with modern UI, styling, and offer a great migration path to a modern UX while preserving most of your existing source code. Moreover, the IDE integrates the Desktop Bridge to build UWP applications you can distribute via the Windows Store.

As you can see in the roadmap, the plan is to continue and increase our investment in this area, specifically around store applications and the ability to check the application status in the store (checking if the customer has paid for the app, if it is a trial, and managing in-app purchases and subscriptions).

We are also going to expand our Win32 API coverage, given Microsoft has added important subsystems to it, and focus on continuous improvement for our support for High-DPI and 4K monitors on Windows. In this regard, we are going to introduce a new image list control that can manage images at multiple resolutions, similarly to what we do in FireMonkey. This will allow the application to avoid relying on image scaling (which often negatively affects image quality) but rather pick the best image for the current screen resolution. In terms of High-DPI support, we are working on the new “Per-Monitor V2” mode Windows 10 offers and plan to focus on resolving a large number of issues the current multi-monitor support has.

Delphi Language and RTL
Beside the Windows 10 focus (which is for both Delphi and C++Builder), there are many other features we are working on for the Delphi personality. We have gone back to the drawing board for the language, and are planning on releasing the new features in phases -- as stability at the compiler level is of critical importance. We found out that  good quality support for nullable types (planned, but deferred) requires changes in other areas of the language. The first we’ll be tackling is custom managed records, that is the ability to define a default parameterless constructor, a destructor and a copy operator